12275 W. 48th Avenue

Wheatridge, CO 80033

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For the last 50 years, the world has experienced an unprecedented jump forward in technological advancements. From computers and internet to smart phones and tablets, electric vehicles and self-driving cars to rockets that are being built to reach Mars, it seems we are definitely in the golden age of technology. Though it is not often thought about in terms of advancements, the plumbing world has experienced some amazing technological feats in the last few years as well. Most recently, scientists from USC’s Information Sciences Institute have developed a new device called the Pipefish. This nifty little gadget is sent through fire hydrants into a city’s underground water system. As an article from Phys.org states, “The device captures real-time video, using sensors and navigation technology to collect data and log its position as it goes.” While the U.S. is soon to face a crisis due to the aging plumbing infrastructure and deteriorating pipes, this invention proves to be a possible game-changer. Denver Water has stated that there are over 3,000 miles of water pipe in the Denver area. Instead of having to manually scope lines to see if they’re broken, imagine being able to view all 3,000 miles and know exactly where each break and crack is? That’s what the Pipefish offers.

Along with this amazing gadget, another new invention is on the horizon that has the ability to help cities better detect lead in water lines. Noticing the devastation caused by lead poisoning during the floods in Flint, MI, a 12-year-old girl from Lone Tree, CO named Gitanjali Rao began looking for a way to help. As someone who started doing experiments at the ripe old age of three, Gitanjali utilized her skills in science to begin working on a solution. She invented a device called Tethys that can detect levels of lead in water pipes much faster than we are currently able to do in America. Using her technology, a person will be able to use his or her smartphone and Gitanjali’s device and have an accurate reading on the lead level in the water within 10 seconds. New tools like these help cities better maintain their underground wet utilities, which in turn helps us at APEX better serve the community. If you have cracks in your sewer line or have lead in your water line, give us a call today for a FREE estimate